Mark Dickinson

Reader in Physics

Mark Dickinson

Manchester is made distinctive by the fact we have two Nobel Laureates on staff, and because most of our academics are active in both teaching and research, so the two are more closely linked than other universities.

I realised a good few years ago that I have spent more than half my life at Manchester, since enrolling as an undergraduate student back in 1978. There’s no good reason to leave; it's a great University.

Manchester is made distinctive by the fact we have two Nobel Laureates on staff, and because most of our academics are active in both teaching and research, so the two are more closely linked than other universities. We are also a large School, so we cover most areas of this very broad subject area.

My teaching

I try to fold in elements of my own research into the courses I teach, and I often invite former PhD students of mine to talk about their current work where applicable.

I enjoy interaction with students, and seeing them develop their problem solving and life skills through the duration of their studies.

My research

I generally work with lasers and optics, and apply these to applications related to biology and medicine, such as 3D imaging in highly scattering tissue, super-resolution imaging of cells (beating the diffraction limit), sensors for measuring metabolites, and how climate change might be affecting sensitive wildlife. I enjoy applying my knowledge and experience to a different area, so helping to solve a problem in medicine with a physics-based approach.

Most of my research is carried out in the Photon Science Institute, which is a cross-faculty research institute.

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